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Pregnancy and Your Teeth

Something as simple as a thorough teeth cleaning may reduce premature birth rates. According to a University of Alabama study, gum disease can cause babies to be born too soon and too small. Babies born too early are at a significant risk of developing serious and lasting health problems. Baby Your Baby recommends that all pregnant women should get their teeth cleaned during the second trimester of their pregnancy.

Get Oral Health Care

  • Taking care of your mouth while you are pregnant is important for you and your baby. Changes to your body when you are pregnancy can make your gums sore or puffy and can make them bleed. This problem is called gingivitis. If gingivitis is not treated, it may lead to more serious gum disease which can lead to tooth loss.
  • Oral health care, including the use of X-rays, pain medication and local anesthesia, is safe throughout pregnancy.
  • Get oral health treatment, as recommended, before delivery.
  • If your last dental visit took place more than 6 months ago, schedule a dental appointment as soon as possible.
  • Tell the dental office that you are pregnant and your due date. This information will help the dental team provide the best care for you.

Practice Good Oral Hygiene

  • Brush your teeth with fluoridated toothpaste twice a day. Replace your toothbrush every 3 or 4 months, or more often if the bristles are frayed.
  • Do not share your toothbrush.
  • Clean between teeth daily with floss.
  • Rinse every night with an over-the-counter fluoridated, alcohol-free mouthrinse.
  • After eating, chew xylitol-containing gum, which can help reduce bacteria that can cause tooth decay.
  • If you vomit, rinse your mouth with a teaspoon of baking soda in a cup of water to stop acid from attaching your teeth.
Learn more about the health of your mouth and teeth.